Michael F. Cohen


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Most Recent Affiliation(s):


  • Facebook and Microsoft Research, Computational Photography, Assistant Professor

Other Affiliation(s):


  • Cornell University, Senior Researcher
  • University of Utah
  • Princeton University

Location:


  • Seattle, Washington, United Kingdom

Bio:

  • SIGGRAPH 1999

    Dr. Michael F. Cohen, senior researcher and manager of the Microsoft graphics research group, joined Microsoft Research in 1994 from Princeton University where he was an Assistant Professor of Computer Science. Dr. Cohen received his Ph.D. in 1992 from the University of Utah. He also holds undergraduate degrees in Art and Civil Engineering from Beloit College and Rutgers University respectively, and an M.S. in Computer Graphics from Cornell. Dr. Cohen also served on the Architecture faculty at Cornell University and was an adjunct faculty member at the University of Utah. His work at the University of Utah focused on spacetime control for linked figure animation. He is perhaps better known for his work on the radiosity method for realistic image synthesis as discussed in his recent book “Radiosity and Image Synthesis” (co-authored by John R. Wallace). Dr. Cohen has published and presented his work internationally in these areas. At Microsoft, Dr. Cohen has worked on a number of projects, including the IBMR projects “The Lumigraph” and “Layered Depth Images”. He is also involved in the “Virtual Cinematographer” project to create automatic camera placement and sequencing of shots for interactive visual experiences, and in adding expressive refinements to the work in linked figure animation. Dr. Cohen served as the papers chair for SIGGRAPH 98, where he was also awarded the 1998 Computer Graphics Achievement Award for the development of practical radiosity methods for realistic image synthesis.  

    SIGGRAPH 1996

    Michael F. Cohen is currently a member of the research staff at Microsoft. He came to Microsoft from Princeton University where he was an Assistant Professor of Computer Science. Michael received his PhD in 1992 from the University of Utah. He also holds undergraduate degrees in Art from Beloit College and in Civil Engineering from Rutgers University. He began his career in computer graphics at Cornell University where he received an MS in 1985. Dr. Cohen also served on the Architecture faculty at Cornell University and was an adjunct faculty member at the University of Utah. His recent work has focused on spacetime control for linked gure animation and variational modeling methods. He is perhaps better known for his work on the radiosity method for realistic image synthesis as discussed in his recent book “Radiosity and Image Synthesis” (co-authored by John R. Wallace). His current interests range from linked gure animation, to image capture and synthesis, to intelligent camera control, and image based rendering. Michael has published widely and presented his work internationally in these and other areas.  

    SIGGRAPH 1994

    Dr. Michael Cohen is currently an Assistant Professor of Computer Science at Princeton University. He holds a Ph.D. from the University of Utah, an M.S. degree from Cornell University, and undergraduate degrees from Rutgers University and Beloit College. From 1985-1988, he was on the faculty of the Program of Computer Graphics at Cornell University where he conducted research in the area of realistic image synthesis, in particular, the development of the Radiosity Method. He has also made contributions in the area of physically based animation of linked figures. Prof. Cohen is an author (with John Wallace) of the recent book, “Radiosity and Realistic Image Synthesis”. Current interests include constrained optimization for animation, image synthesis, CAGD, and scientific visualization.

    SIGGRAPH 1992

    Mr. Cohen is a Masters Student in computer visualization at the University of Illinois, Chicago. He is an advanced “C” and UNIX programmer. Mr. Cohen’s studies include advanced visualization techniques in business applications. He has worked for over a year with Dr. Jarett in researching the parallel coordinate geometry required to develop “N” View. His masters thesis is tentatively defined to include the research he performed working on this project.  

     


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