Christopher G. Healey





Most Recent Affiliation(s):


  • University of California and Berkeley, Postdoctoral Researcher

Bio:

  • SIGGRAPH 2010

    Christopher G. Healey received a B.Math from the University of Waterloo in Waterloo, Canada, and an M.Sc. and Ph.D. from the University of British Columbia in Vancouver, Canada. Following a postdoctoral fellowship at the University of California at Berkeley, he joined the Department of Computer Science at North Carolina State University, where he is currently an Associate Professor. His research interests include visualization, graphics, visual perception, and areas of applied mathematics, databases, artificial intelligence, and  aesthetics related to visual analysis and data management.   

    SIGGRAPH 1999

    Dr. Christopher G. Healey is an Assistant Professor of Computer Science at North Carolina State University. He received a BMath at the University of Waterloo, Canada in 1990 and a MSc and PhD at the University of British Columbia, Canada in 1996. During his PhD, he was supervised by Dr. Kellogg S. Booth  (Department of Computer Science) and Dr. James T. Enns (Department of Psychology). Prior to starting at North Carolina, Dr. Healey completed a two-year postdoctoral fellowship in computer graphics with Dr. Carlo Séquin at the University of California, Berkeley. Dr. Healey’s dissertation studied methods for displaying effectively large, multidimensional datasets during scientific visualization. This work investigated methods for exploiting the low-level human visual system for information representation. His current research focuses on the use of visual features like color, texture, and apparent motion for analyzing multidimensional data. Dr. Healey has taught undergraduate and graduate courses in computer graphics and visualization, and has lectured in a course at SIGGRAPH 98.  

    SIGGRAPH 1998

    Christopher Healey is a postdoctoral researcher working in computer graphics with Dr. Carlo Sequin at the University of California, Berkeley. He received a B. Math at the University of Waterloo, Canada in 1990, and a M.Sc. and Ph.D in Computer Science at the University of British Columbia., Canada in 1996. During his Ph.D. he was supervised by Dr. Kellog S. Booth (Department of Computer Science) and Dr. James T. Eons (Department of Psychology). His dissertation studied methods for displaying effectively large, multidimensional datasets during scientific visualization. This work investigated methods for exploiting the low-level human visual system during visualization. His current research focuses on the use of visual features like color, orientation, and texture for analyzing multidimensional data. He is also investigating statistical, mathematical, and database techniques for preprocessing large datasets to reduce their size and dimensionality before visualization.  

     


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