Steven Seitz


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  • SIGGRAPH 2000

    Steven Seitz is an Assistant Professor of Robotics and Computer Science at Carnegie Mellon University, where he conducts research in image-based rendering, graphics, and computer vision. Before joining the Robotics Institute in August 1998, he spent a year visiting the Vision Technology Group at Microsoft Research, and a previous summer in the Advanced Technology Group at Apple Computer. He received his B.A. in computer science and mathematics at the University of California, Berkeley in 1991 and his Ph.D. in computer sciences at the University of Wisconsin, Madison in 1997. His current research focuses on the problem of acquiring and manipulating visual representations of real environments using semi- and fully-automated techniques. This effort has led to the development of “View Morphing” techniques for interpolating different images of a scene and voxel-based algorithms for computing photorealistic scene reconstructions. His work in these areas has appeared at SJGGRA.PH and in international computer vision conferences and journals, and he co-organized courses on 3D Photography taught at CVPR ’99 and SIGGRAPH 99. Seitz was awarded the 1999 David Marr Prize in Computational Vision for his co-authored paper on “Space Carving” at ICCV 99.  

    SIGGRAPH 1999

    Steven Seitz is an Assistant Professor of Robotics and Computer Science at Carnegie Mellon University, where he conducts research in image-based rendering, graphics, and computer vision. Before joining the Robotics Institute in August 1998, he spent a year visiting the Vision Technology Group at Microsoft Research, and a previous summer in the Advanced Technology Group at Apple Computer. His current research focuses on the problem of acquiring and manipulating visual representations of real environments using semi- and fully-automated techniques. This effort has led to the development of “View Morphing ” techniques for interpolating different images of a scene and voxel-based algorithms for computing photorealistic scene reconstructions. His work in these areas has appeared at SIGGRAPH and in international computer vision conferences and journals. He received his B.A. in computer science and mathematics at the University of California, Berkeley in 1991 and his Ph.D. in computer sciences at the University of Wisconsin, Madison in 1997.  

     


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