Annabel Castro


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Location:


  • Mexico

Bio:

  • SIGGRAPH Asia 2020

    The overlapping of geographic, virtual and mental spaces, landscape as trajectory, identity, Artificial Intelligence and language are recurring subjects in her artwork. Caliban Robot: Artificial Stubbornness Evoking a Shakespearian Character is her fist installation reflecting on AI. Presented at the festival Tokyo Style in Gothenburg in 2004, the robot detected visitors to approach and insult them. Her first work with data visualization reflecting on identity was presented in 2008 at the Transmediale festival (45 letters to Magnussons before the spring…. ). The internet work connected the virtual stream of information to real space and people through personal handwritten letters that snatch, like spam, information of its receivers to reach them. The letters entered the home of the aleatory recipients and was present online altering their data context. Since 2013 Castro has been developing work concerned with territory and Japanese heritage in Latin America. She has exhibited works such as Sonorous Phytography for Ciudad Okinawa, commissioned by the Bolivian culture center mARTadero. During the Okinawa Battle in 1945 tens of thousands of Okinawans, Japanese from other prefectures and Americans died in the Mabuni fields, in the south of Okinawa Japan. Months afterwards vegetables grew exceptionally large due to the abnormal soil richness caused by the remains of the fallen. In the same manner the war caused the arrival and establishment of an Okinawa community in Santa Cruz Bolivia. The artwork, an interactive electronic sketchbook, portrays passersby through their voices, aural setting, handwriting and comments about their plants. An intimate monument to the communities inhabiting the hybrid-cultural context of surroundings in Santa Cruz. Outside in: exiled at home is part of a series focused on our invisible-to-us data representations, the low-resolution representations of ourselves crafted by machine learning algorithms that snatch and judge digital debris of our daily life.