“Geometry compression” by Deering

  • ©Michael F. Deering

Conference:


Type:


Title:

    Geometry compression

Presenter(s)/Author(s):



Abstract:


    This paper introduces the concept of Geometry Compression, allowing 3D triangle data to be represented with a factor of 6 to 10 times fewer bits than conventional techniques, with only slight losses in object quality. The technique is amenable to rapid decompression in both software and hardware implementations; if 3D rendering hardware contains a geometry decompression unit, application geometry can be stored in memory in compressed format. Geometry is first represented as a generalized triangle mesh, a data structure that allows each instance of a vertex in a linear stream to specify an average of two triangles. Then a variable length compression is applied to individual positions, colors, and normals. Delta compression followed by a modified Huffman compression is used for wpositions and colors; a novel table-based approach is used for normals. The table allows any useful normal to be represented by an 18-bit index, many normals can be represented with index deltas of 8 bits or less. Geometry compression is a general space-time tradeoff, and offers advantages at every level of the memory/interconnect hierarchy: less storage space is needed on disk, less transmission time is needed on networks.

References:


    1. Cook, Robert, L. Carpenter, and E. Catmull. The Reyes Image Rendering Architecture. Proceedings of SIGGRAPH ’87 (Anaheim, CA, July 27-31, 1987). In Computer Graphics 21, 4 (july 1987), 95-102.]]
    2. Danskin, John. Compressing the X Graphics Protocol, Ph.D. Thesis, Princeton University, 1994.]]
    3. Deering, Michael, S. Winner, B. Schediwy, C. Duffy and N. Hunt. The Triangle Processor and Normal Vector Shader: A VLSI system for High Performance Graphics. Proceedings of SIGGRAPH ’88 (Atlanta, GA, Aug 1-5, 1988). In Computer Graphics 22, 4 (July 1988), 21-30.]]
    4. Deering, Michael, and S. Nelson. Leo: A System for Cost Effective Shaded 3D Graphics. Proceedings of SIGGRAPH ’93 (Anaheim, California, August 1-6, 1993). In Computer Graphics (August 1993), 101-108.]]
    5. Durkin, James, and J. Hughes. Nonpolygonal Isosulface Rendering for Large Volume Datasets. Proceedings of Visualization ’94, IEEE, 293-300.]]
    6. Foley, James, A. van Dam, S. Feiner and J Hughes. Computer Graphics: Principles and Practice, 2nd ed., Addison-Wesley, 1990.]]
    7. Pennebaker, William, and J. Mitchell. JPEG Still Image Compression Standard, Van Nostrand Reinhold, 1993.]]


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