“Wave animation synthesis directly from a real video” by Sakaino

  • ©Hidetomo Sakaino

  • ©Hidetomo Sakaino

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Title:

    Wave animation synthesis directly from a real video

Presenter(s)/Author(s):



Abstract:


    In this sketch, a semi-automatic wave animation method/system is presented by a direct use of a real wave video with a modified optical flow method. Previous method: A realistic fluid-like  animation such as river and ocean has become an intensive research topic. Various wave animation methods have been proposed based on wave generation theory [1]. [1] presented an energy spectrum based wave generation method. [2] applied [1]’s method to animate a harbor and river of an oil painting. Issue: These conventional methods for a natural scene needed to empirically define optimal parameters interactively.  [1] shows a very realistical wave motion, though, deep knowledge of a wave property is needed. Using a ramdom varible leads to a plausible wave motion but it  is hard to control how such as a wave activity shows.  For an inexperienced user, a wave animation method should be hopefully much more simplified.

    Motivation: Thus, this was motivated us to propose a quick wave motion generator using a real wave video. What a user  needs is only to collect a wave video and then input it  into our system. Our system: In our system, computer vision-based optical flow and physical properties of a wave sequence is used to estimate parameters which are  necessary for a wave generation equation over time. As shown in Figure 1, a user simply handles to select a  wave video and press a start buttom to get an animation only by a mouse operation with a default rendering setting. Thus, a realistic wave motion similar to what a  user wishes to animate can be synthesized almost  automatically while above previous methods take a  great effort and time

References:


    1. J. Tessendorf. 1999. Simulating ocean water. SIGGRAPH, in Course Notes.
    2. Y. Y. Chuang et al. 2005. Animating pictures with stochastic motion textures. Proc. SIGGRAPH.
    3. K. Horikawa. 1978. Coastal engineering – an introduction to ocean engineering. Univ. of Tokyo Press.


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©Hidetomo Sakaino ©Hidetomo Sakaino ©Hidetomo Sakaino

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