“The Bailey-Derek Grammar: Recording the Craft of Wire-Bending in the Trinidad Carnival” by Noel

Conference:


Title:

    The Bailey-Derek Grammar: Recording the Craft of Wire-Bending in the Trinidad Carnival

Presenter(s):



Abstract:


    This paper presents work on the development of a shape grammar that records the dying, undocumented craft of wire-bending in the Trinidad Carnival. This craft is important for the building and continuation of cultural heritage and identity. Due to the lack of prior research in this non-Western design practice, the author conducted site visits, interviews and observations, and visually examined wire-bent artifacts in Trinidad to develop this grammar. This paper presents the materials, steps and shape rules that begin to synthesize the craft, as well as one design. This study and the resulting grammar have positive implications for design education and practice.

References:


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    21. Derek, Stephen. 2013. Interview by Vernelle Noel. Personal Interview.

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    32. Personal Interview by Vernelle Noel. 2013.

    33. Personal Interview by Vernelle Noel. 2013.

    34. Personal Interview by Vernelle Noel. 2013.

    35. This portion of the process steps (computations) in Figure 3 was selected from a larger group of steps for the focus of this paper.


Type:



Art Paper/Presentation Type: