“Control strategies for physically simulated characters performing two-player competitive sports” by Won, Gopinath and Hodgins

  • ©Jungdam Won, Deepak Gopinath, and Jessica K. Hodgins

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Title:

    Control strategies for physically simulated characters performing two-player competitive sports

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Abstract:


    In two-player competitive sports, such as boxing and fencing, athletes often demonstrate efficient and tactical movements during a competition. In this paper, we develop a learning framework that generates control policies for physically simulated athletes who have many degrees-of-freedom. Our framework uses a two step-approach, learning basic skills and learning bout-level strategies, with deep reinforcement learning, which is inspired by the way that people how to learn competitive sports. We develop a policy model based on an encoder-decoder structure that incorporates an autoregressive latent variable, and a mixture-of-experts decoder. To show the effectiveness of our framework, we implemented two competitive sports, boxing and fencing, and demonstrate control policies learned by our framework that can generate both tactical and natural-looking behaviors. We also evaluate the control policies with comparisons to other learning configurations and with ablation studies.

References:


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